The sale of Minecraft and Mojang to Microsoft was actioned to keep Mojang co-founder Markus "Notch" Persson sane, he says.

In a post on his personal blog, Persson – the creator of sandbox phenomenon Minecraft – has detailed how he felt so overwhelmed by Minecraft’s staggering success that selling the game ended up being the only option.

“It’s not about the money. It’s about my sanity,” he wrote.

“I don’t see myself as a real game developer. I make games because it’s fun, and because I love games and I love to program, but I don’t make games with the intention of them becoming huge hits, and I don’t try to change the world.

Minecraft certainly became a huge hit, and people are telling me it’s changed games. I never meant for it to do either. It’s certainly flattering, and to gradually get thrust into some kind of public spotlight is interesting."

However, Persson said even though he stepped away from active development on the game some time ago, he couldn't escape the negative side of having such a popular game.

“I was at home with a bad cold a couple of weeks ago when the internet exploded with hate against me over some kind of EULA situation that I had nothing to do with. I was confused. I didn’t understand. I tweeted this in frustration,” he said.

“Later on, I watched the This is Phil Fish video on YouTube and started to realize I didn’t have the connection to my fans I thought I had. I’ve become a symbol. I don’t want to be a symbol, responsible for something huge that I don’t understand, that I don’t want to work on, that keeps coming back to me.

“I’m not an entrepreneur. I’m not a CEO. I’m a nerdy computer programmer who likes to have opinions on Twitter.”

Persson intends to continue doing game jams like Ludum Dare, along with small web experiments.

“If I ever accidentally make something that seems to gain traction, I’ll probably abandon it immediately," he said.

“Considering the public image of me already is a bit skewed, I don’t expect to get away from negative comments by doing this, but at least now I won’t feel a responsibility to read them.

“I’m aware this goes against a lot of what I’ve said in public. I have no good response to that. I’m also aware a lot of you were using me as a symbol of some perceived struggle. I’m not. I’m a person, and I’m right there struggling with you," he added.

“I love you. All of you. Thank you for turning Minecraft into what it has become, but there are too many of you, and I can’t be responsible for something this big. In one sense, it belongs to Microsoft now. In a much bigger sense, it’s belonged to all of you for a long time, and that will never change.”